Into a Light Both Brilliant and Unseen: Conversations with Contemporary Black Poets

By Malin Pereira | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

A community of scholars, poets, and friends has helped this book become a reality. Jeff Leak was a constant support and open ear, ever ready with helpful suggestions. Deborah Bosley proved herself an able travel agent and companion for the Cave Canem tenth anniversary celebration in New York. Cyrus Cassells made certain I was invited to the party, and Cornelius Eady gave me almost two hours of his time there. Wanda Coleman trusted me based on an incendiary and exhilarating moment at Davidson College. Thylias Moss stuck with me through our mutual challenges over more than a year. Joanne Gabbin was a ready support and advocate, as was Henry Louis Gates Jr. Rita Dove and Elizabeth Alexander welcomed me into their homes and family lives, however briefly, and kept up with me afterward. Harryette Mullen was responsive, efficient, and on task! Yusef Komunyakaa shared with me two intense hours in his office in the beautiful Lillian Vernon Creative Writers House at NYU. John Gruesser and Daniel Shealy listened and sagely counseled throughout the decade it took to do this work, and Tony Jackson helped me realize that this would be an ideal project for me. Shanna Benjamin, Herman Beavers, Jennifer Ryan, Ivy Wilson, Lynn Keller, and Meta Jones offered me opportune and exciting conversations at important junctures. Many thanks to my editors at the University of Georgia Press—Andrew Berzanskis and Erika Stevens —who found great readers for the project at the proposal and manuscript stages, readers who helped this book become what it needed to be. Spokenword poet, actor, and black-theater producer Quentin Talley has enriched Charlotte—and me—more than he could know. The Sangati community nurtures me every week. Elizabeth Mills, as both a poetry scholar and an English department chair, has been a fellow traveler and good friend on our shared road, and helped create opportunities for me to meet poets such as Coleman. Meredith Green and Lesley Brown are “friend[s] of my mind.”

At UNC Charlotte, the staff in the Africana Studies and English departments, most especially Elsie Byrd, David Landrum, Jennie Mussington, Monica Alston, and Angie Williams, provided administrative backup as well as satisfying conversations across several years of this work. My dean,

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Into a Light Both Brilliant and Unseen: Conversations with Contemporary Black Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Walking into the Light - Contemporary Black Poetry, Traditions, and the Individual Talent 1
  • Wanda Coleman 9
  • Yusef Komunyakaa 45
  • Rita Dove 69
  • Harryette Munen 100
  • Thylias Moss 122
  • Cornenus Eady 163
  • Cyrus Cassells 201
  • Elizabeth Alexander 216
  • Bibliography 243
  • Index 261
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 276

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.