CHAPTER EIGHT

Profane allows his erection to determine which employment agency he will go to and thus finds himself once more in contact with Rachel Owlglass, who sends him off to a job as a night watchman. The history of Pig Bodine’s adventures as the generator of pornographic radio messages is related, Roony Winsome approaches Rachel in an effort to get closer to Paola and Profane is initiated into the ways of the Crew. Stencil, who has met a German engineer called Kurt Mondaugen, begins to tell Eigenvalue the story of Mondaugen’s experiences in Southwest Africa.

PC226.27 PF214.34 B198.29 Inanimate money was to get animate warmth While Profane’s mistrust of the inanimate aligns him, like the young Schoenmaker, with the “Good Guys,” his somewhat cynical formulation of the relationship between money and sex is a reminder of his marginal status among the company of the righteous.

PC227.9 PF215.13 B199.4 inanimate schmuck That Profane should think of his penis as inanimate speaks volumes about his attitude toward sex.

PC227.14 PF215.17 B199.9 a bum lying across the aisle “Taken together, the Crew, as caricatures of alienation, and Profane’s fellow victims, as very real examples of disaffection, make up the ‘highly alienated populace’ Sidney Stencil had prophesied in 1919 [PC506.27]” (Slade 111).

PC228.21 PF216.20 B200.11 a true windup woman An anticipation of another fantasy of Profane’s, the “all-electronic woman” (PC414.24). The image is linked with V. through the association with the clock eye worn by her many avatars. Bongo-Shaftsbury’s reference to a “clockwork doll” (PC78.8) also comes to mind, as do the

-110-

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A Companion to V
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • A Note on the Title xvii
  • Chapter One 1
  • Chapter Two 22
  • Chapter Three 35
  • Chapter Four 61
  • Chapter Five 66
  • Chapter Six 74
  • Chapter Seven 80
  • Chapter Eight 110
  • Chapter Nine 115
  • Chapter Ten 141
  • Chapter Eleven 147
  • Chapter Twelve 163
  • Chapter Thirteen 168
  • Chapter Fourteen 171
  • Chapter Fifteen 182
  • Chapter Sixteen 184
  • Epilogue 191
  • References 205
  • Index 213
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