The Year of the Lash: Free People of Color in Cuba and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World

By Michele Reid-Vazquez | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The development and completion of The Year of the Lash has been a shared journey. This project would not have come to fruition without the initial support of several faculty at the University of Texas at Austin. I owe a special thanks to Aline Helg and Toyin Falola, who shepherded the dissertation phase of this study and continued to make suggestions as I converted the work into a book manuscript. I would also like to thank Jonathan Brown, Ginny Burnett, Susan Deans-Smith, Myron Gutmann, James Sidbury, and Pauline Strong for their guidance and support.

Critical financial assistance from the following institutions and organizations facilitated research in Cuba and Spain: the University of Texas at Austin’s Department of History, Institute of Latin American Studies, College of Liberal Arts, and Study Abroad Office; the Fulbright Commission, the Conference on Latin American History, and the Program for Cultural Cooperation at the Spanish Ministry of Education, Culture, and Sports in United States Universities. The knowledgeable staff at the Archivo General de Indias in Seville, the Archivo Histórico Nacional in Madrid, and the Archivo Nacional de Cuba, the Biblioteca Nacional José Martí, and the Instituto de Literatura y Lingüística in Havana, as well as the insights of Asmaa Bourhass, Tomás Fernández Robaina, Fé Iglesias García, and Pedro Pablo Rodríguez enriched this study.

Numerous institutions provided financial support for revising the manuscript. A postdoctoral fellowship from the Center for the Americas at Wesleyan University enabled me to initiate changes and conduct

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