The Year of the Lash: Free People of Color in Cuba and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World

By Michele Reid-Vazquez | Go to book overview

5 The Rise and Fall of the Militia of Color: From
the Constitution of 1812 to the Escalera Era

Antonio Vazquez had the luck of being drafted as a pardo militia-
man … but according to the published regulations … I request that
he be exempted from service … because he is my only son and my only
source of support
.

—URSULA VIVIANA

In March 1844, the same month the O’Donnell administration initiated the targeted expulsion of libres de color from Cuba, officials also disarmed moreno and pardo battalions. Over the next few months, the Military Commission trials convicted or detained an array of militiamen as co-conspirators in the Escalera rebellions. Judges accused Ciriaco Consuegra, first corporal in Havana’s moreno battalion, of using subversive language to help foment the conspiracy and had him expelled.1 They also sentenced African-born Francisco Abrahantes, a lieutenant in the moreno militia, to banishment, but he died in prison before he could be sent into exile. Because of Félix Barbosa’s position as a sublieutenant in the pardo battalion, his status as a wealthy and well-known mortician, and his regular contributions to charities, authorities arrested and detained him for almost a year before finally acquitting him.2 Convinced of the black and mulatto militiamen’s complicity in the Escalera revolts, Cuban authorities dismantled the institution in June. In September 1844, Spain finalized the process by issuing a royal order authorizing the extinction of the militia of color in Cuba.3 These actions ended the participation of libres de color in a centuries-old military practice until its reinstatement a decade later.

A colonial corporate body, the military had come to symbolize privilege and prestige for Spaniards, creoles, and free people of color who served. Within the free community of African descent in particular, colonial militia service offered imperial benefits, social status, and the public acknowledgment of free blacks and mulattoes as valuable defenders

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Year of the Lash: Free People of Color in Cuba and the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.