Jury Discrimination: The Supreme Court, Public Opinion, and a Grassroots Fight for Racial Equality in Mississippi

By Christopher Waldrep | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

AT THE OUTSET OF THIS PROJECT, Robert Palmer offered useful suggestions. James Martel met with me to discuss Emerson. My graduate assistant, Melissa Barthelemy, read over the entire manuscript and provided me with fourteen pages of commentary. Two other graduate students, Mike Caires and Tina Speidel, journeyed with me to the National Archives to examine records of the Secret Service. Les Benedict read the entire manuscript, offering many valuable comments and suggestions. Pam Brandwein shared her thoughts on Joseph Bradley and the Supreme Court via a running e-mail dialogue that forced me to rethink my initial ideas. Jarbel Rodriguez and Charles Donahue Jr. offered detailed critiques of the first chapter. Eva Sheppard Wolf led the San Francisco State University history colloquium in a helpful critique of a portion of this manuscript. My first thoughts about John G. Cashman appeared in a special issue of Nineteenth Century American History, edited by Bill Carrigan. His encouragement and commentary clarified my thinking about that Mississippi conservative. My initial ideas about Joseph Bradley can be found in Journal of Supreme Court History (34 [2009]: 149–63), thanks to the encouragement of Mel Urofsky. I also presented my findings about Bradley at the American Society for Legal History meeting, where Linda Przybyszewski and Tim Huebner offered useful comments. Mike Fitzgerald took time out from his vacation not only to read over the entire manuscript but also to spend two hours going over it in the Martinez Starbucks (my first visit). Maureen O’Rourke of the New Jersey Historical Society provided essential assistance as I explored the Joseph P. Bradley Papers. For the University Press of Georgia, Nancy Grayson offered encouragement, John Joerschke asked good questions, and Barbara Wojhoski provided superb copyediting. My family, Pamela, Janelle, and Andrea, as always, provided the foundational support that made it possible for me to write this book.

-ix-

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