Jury Discrimination: The Supreme Court, Public Opinion, and a Grassroots Fight for Racial Equality in Mississippi

By Christopher Waldrep | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
How Revolutionary
Was the Civil War?

AFTER GRADUATING FROM COLLEGE and setting up his law
practice, Dabney Marshall found he had to balance his core beliefs against the
demands of society, public opinion. At first, Marshall simply refused to com-
promise. Though he lived in Vicksburg, a place notorious for its brothels and
drinking, Marshall sided with abstract law against the more popular pleasures
of the flesh. He joined the prohibitionists, a beleaguered minority in Vicksburg
but one with an important patron—John Cashman, editor of the
Vicksburg
Evening Post, and a law-and-order opponent of alcohol, free silver, and lynch-
ing. Cashman published articles by Marshall and praised his skills as a lawyer.
In their writings, both Cashman and Marshall applauded the basic decency
of Mississippi whites. Both wanted to be majoritarians, but their faith in the
public really amounted to a hope that most white Mississippians shared their
confidence in the rule of law. The weakness in this proposition ultimately be-
came apparent to both men
.1

Favoring prohibition necessarily meant endorsing increased national power.
Both Cashman and Marshall could do this and not just to control the evils
of liquor. In 1886, Cashman endorsed a proposal to require federal judges to
investigate reports of persons killed or injured for expressing their opinions.
Cashman was even unconcerned that this notion came from Senator George F.
Hoar (1826–1904), a Massachusetts Republican long notorious for his criti-
cism of white southern racism and violence. For most white Southerners, the
entire Hoar family seemed distasteful as the embodiment of northern anti-
slavery extremism. In 1844, Hoar’s father, Samuel Hoar, had even gone to
South Carolina to rescue African American sailors whom local authorities
had locked up to prevent slave rebellions. One southern newspaper dismissed
the younger Hoar’s bill as “nothing more or less than another of Mr. Hoar’s

-65-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jury Discrimination: The Supreme Court, Public Opinion, and a Grassroots Fight for Racial Equality in Mississippi
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 325

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.