Jury Discrimination: The Supreme Court, Public Opinion, and a Grassroots Fight for Racial Equality in Mississippi

By Christopher Waldrep | Go to book overview

Conclusion

WILLIS MOLLISON AND DABNEY MARSHALL’S campaign against Mississippi’s all-white jury system provides an opportunity to examine the connections that run through the American criminal justice system. First, and most obviously, the tendrils of racial prejudice reached into American courts and their juries. Considerable scholarly ink has been spilled on efforts to keep blacks away from the ballot box and segregate their access to public accommodations. At the end of the nineteenth century, state legislatures passed segregation laws and enacted the grandfather clauses, poll taxes, and literacy tests, which removed most blacks from the voting rolls. At this historical moment, the states also whitened their juries. All-white juries played an essential role in guaranteeing that blacks could be intimidated and harassed if they dared challenge their discrimination.

Mollison and Marshall’s challenge to Mississippi jury procedures tested the ligaments binding the state courts to rules articulated by the U.S. Supreme Court. Recent scholars have emphasized the ability of lower courts to resist supervision by the U.S. Supreme Court, but Marshall’s campaign complicates this picture. Mississippi’s highest court did not, in fact, dare challenge the U.S. Supreme Court’s rules, but it is also true that the Court seemed to make it a point not to do anything that would make state judges want to challenge its rules. The Court decided that the appearance of discrimination did not prove the discrimination. It was not enough to show that only white men served as jurors in majority-black counties and had done so for years. The discriminators had to confess. Setting the bar so high discouraged defense attorneys from challenging all-white juries and signaled court officials that they had only to keep quiet about their

-231-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jury Discrimination: The Supreme Court, Public Opinion, and a Grassroots Fight for Racial Equality in Mississippi
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 325

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.