The Culture of Property: Race, Class, and Housing Landscapes in Atlanta, 1880-1950

By Leeann Lands | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TWO
Atlanta, Park-Neighborhoods, and the
New Urban Aesthetic, 1880 to 1917

“The improvement of cities is a matter of vital concern,” Walter G. Cooper, the secretary to Atlanta’s chamber of commerce wrote in South Atlantic Quarterly in 1908.1 Cooper went on to trace the origins of the aesthetic movements that were redrawing and reshaping cities throughout the world. He described the impact of Daniel Burnham’s White City at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago and explained the international origins of contemporary city plans. He was knowledgeable regarding building-height restrictions, a practice only just gaining a following within the United States, and restrictive covenants, limits on property use that were spreading through the newest and most fashionable neighborhoods. Cooper’s rhetoric celebrated balance, order, and thoughtful composition of public and private space. He concluded, “The old principle of law that a man has no right to do that which will injure his neighbor, in its modern application, is carried into the realm of aesthetics, and anything that grates upon the ear or offends the eye or the nose is held to be an injury.”2 Turning to Atlanta, Cooper highlighted the city’s plans for parkways and parks, use of deed restrictions, and adoption of radial and gridiron street layouts, implicitly arguing that the South’s Gate City could hold its own in this new movement. As if confirming this assertion, three years later Harvey Johnson explained to readers of American City that, after a series of infrastructure expansions, city leaders were mounting plans for parks and a civic center.3

These and other articles demonstrate Atlanta leaders’ awareness of and support for urban trends taking hold throughout the United States and world. Indeed, the articles reveal how common city boosterism—situated in an era of urban competition and communication expansion—helped transmit aesthetic knowledge, taste cultures, and city planning know-how. In the early 1900s, Atlanta’s white civic elite assessed how their city compared with not just the region’s Annistons and Augustas but with the nation’s Cincinnatis and Chicagos. What they found was a haphazard array of business and industry, houses, alleys, and vacant lots.

-41-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Culture of Property: Race, Class, and Housing Landscapes in Atlanta, 1880-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 297

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.