The Culture of Property: Race, Class, and Housing Landscapes in Atlanta, 1880-1950

By Leeann Lands | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Exclusion and Park-Neighborhood
Building, 1922 to 1929

In the 1920s, subdivision building drove Atlanta’s largest housing boom to date. Established housing developers and new speculative builders alike platted, subdivided, graded, planted, and hawked new neighborhoods ranging from four square blocks to five hundred acres. Sales values peaked in Atlanta from 1922 to 1925; sales volume, in 1927. From 1924 to 1928, builders completed at least fourteen thousand units, and from 1925 to 1928, $23 million worth of housing. As a result, the city filled in and spread out. Some 1920s-era projects were entirely new, as when Sylvan Hills launched in 1922, or when J. P. King auctioned Roxboro Park’s first forty lots in 1927. In other cases, developers announced expansions to already existing neighborhoods, as when Ansley Park advertised its “Annex Lots” in 1923. Like the prewar exclusive park-neighborhoods, those sweeping across Atlanta’s suburbs in the 1920s promised natural settings, restrictions, and prestige. And they diffused racial and class exclusion across the landscape.1

As park-neighborhood building accelerated in the 1920s, restrictive covenants dictated the racial and class composition of more and more of the Atlanta landscape. Typically spelled out in a deed or subdivision plat, as in the covenants for Inman Park or Ansley Park in the 1880s and 1900s, such restrictions established minimum building costs or lot sizes, or specified use (e.g., residential, commercial) for a specific period of time (e.g., forty or sixty years). A subdivision developer could, for example, require that properties be used only for residential purposes or that buildings measure no less than, for instance, 1,500 square feet, or cost no less than two thousand dollars. Covenants could also, as discussed in chapter 2, regulate race. A developer could require that a property not be sold or leased to “Semites” or “people of African descent.” However, restrictive covenants were less successful in controlling race, class, and housing practices in older, established areas of the city. Consequently, white elites cast about for ways to manage race and class across the whole city, in established neighborhoods as well as new suburban enclaves.

-135-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Culture of Property: Race, Class, and Housing Landscapes in Atlanta, 1880-1950
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 297

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.