Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free

By Victoria Biggs | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
The Hidden People at Home

This mess is a place!

Unknown source

I can’t spread butter on toast, pour water, or slice bread.
Opening bottles? That’s always good fun. My arms wave about
when I try to run upstairs and I still can’t ride a bike. I’m always
knocking into furniture and my sisters say it is like having a rhi-
noceros from the zoo in our house!

Joseph, 13

Déjà vu, anybody?

Home is meant to be a place where you can kick back and relax (‘kick’ being the operative word) but when I’m there it often resembles a war zone. Here is a summary of a typical relaxing evening. I go into the Colditz kitchen to make a drink, starting with a disagreement with the kettle. The kettle wins. Trying not to shriek, I flail my scalded arm around, knocking over the sugar and punching another boarder in the ribs. I then lose my balance and nearly pitch into the sink, sending cocoa powder cascading onto the floor and causing an anguished cry of, ‘Vicky, what are you doing?’ as I overturn someone’s Instant Noodles. I hope you enjoy this stay in my house.

-25-

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Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Chapter 1 - A Recipe for Chaos 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Hidden People at Home 25
  • Chapter 3 - A Survival Guide to School 47
  • Chapter 4 - Making the Grade 73
  • Chapter 5 - Crossing the Chasm 83
  • Chapter 6 - The Case of the Cooked Tomato 97
  • Chapter 7 - Bullying 105
  • Chapter 8 - Coping with Growing Up 121
  • Chapter 9 - Diagnosis–A Pipe Dream? 137
  • Chapter 10 - Dealing with Dyspraxia- What Can I Do Now? 155
  • Chapter 11 - Lying Diagonally in a Parallel Universe 167
  • Acknowledgements 190
  • Useful Addresses and Websites 192
  • References and Further Reading 196
  • Index 197
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