Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free

By Victoria Biggs | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 7
Bullying

Life is mostly froth and bubble,
Two things stand in stone,
Kindness in another’s trouble,
Courage in your own.

Adam Lindsay Gordon, Ye Wearie Way Farer


Warning signs to watch for

Bullying is a well-worn patch in the dyspraxic tapestry. People who have different coloured skin, foreigners, those who practise another religion, people who wear glasses, people with beaky noses, people with freckled faces–you’re all different from me, so I will make sure that I hurt and terrify you as much as I can.

This is a bully’s logic. Those of us with learning differences often stick out like a fistful of sore thumbs so we’re immediately at risk from people who think in this senseless way. But if you look closely you will notice something else about the bullying logic: it could be the person with DCD who is the bully.

At one of my schools in Saudi Arabia there was a boy named Liam. No one liked him much. That wasn’t surprising, as he was one of the

-105-

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Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Chapter 1 - A Recipe for Chaos 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Hidden People at Home 25
  • Chapter 3 - A Survival Guide to School 47
  • Chapter 4 - Making the Grade 73
  • Chapter 5 - Crossing the Chasm 83
  • Chapter 6 - The Case of the Cooked Tomato 97
  • Chapter 7 - Bullying 105
  • Chapter 8 - Coping with Growing Up 121
  • Chapter 9 - Diagnosis–A Pipe Dream? 137
  • Chapter 10 - Dealing with Dyspraxia- What Can I Do Now? 155
  • Chapter 11 - Lying Diagonally in a Parallel Universe 167
  • Acknowledgements 190
  • Useful Addresses and Websites 192
  • References and Further Reading 196
  • Index 197
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