Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free

By Victoria Biggs | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements
The acknowledgements section usually comes at the beginning of the book, but here in the parallel universe we do things differently. Now that you have gone on a walk through a dyspraxic world and hopefully been helped and entertained by what you found there, please take time to read about the people who made it possible for me to unwrap the gift of dyspraxia. Without them, this book would still be stuck in my head and I would still be trapped in the cage:
Mr and Mrs Smith and Mrs Heyes, key-keepers of Colditz, whose trust made all the difference. They slid back the first bolt by convincing me that far from being useless, I actually verge on the terrific.
Mum and Dad, who realized this fact long before I did. My new never-say-never philosophy is summed up with these immortal words: ‘Three people more than enough for a quartet, anyhow!’
The neurologist Dr Pam Tomlin, who formally introduced me to my brain, and the clinical psychologist Carys Pritchard, who helped me to make sense of it.
My special needs teacher, Mrs A, who puts up with the aforementioned brain and demolishes the chaos. ‘Dyspraxia is not an imperfection, it’s just a different way of thinking!’
Mrs Gault, who was canny enough to perk up Pythagoras with poetry. I can almost overlook the fact that you are a maths teacher.
The resident dragon, Mrs Copland, who deserves the Victoria Cross for entering a war zone (my room) at great personal risk and helping me to tidy up.
Lauren ‘Gingerbread’ Aspden, Kerry Bargelli, Angela (hatched any plans yet?) Loxham, Anna Li, and the rest of the Colditz chain-gang, who are always on hand to help whenever I get stuck in a toilet/lose my French homework/twist a few limbs…

-190-

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Caged in Chaos: A Dyspraxic Guide to Breaking Free
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Foreword 7
  • Chapter 1 - A Recipe for Chaos 11
  • Chapter 2 - The Hidden People at Home 25
  • Chapter 3 - A Survival Guide to School 47
  • Chapter 4 - Making the Grade 73
  • Chapter 5 - Crossing the Chasm 83
  • Chapter 6 - The Case of the Cooked Tomato 97
  • Chapter 7 - Bullying 105
  • Chapter 8 - Coping with Growing Up 121
  • Chapter 9 - Diagnosis–A Pipe Dream? 137
  • Chapter 10 - Dealing with Dyspraxia- What Can I Do Now? 155
  • Chapter 11 - Lying Diagonally in a Parallel Universe 167
  • Acknowledgements 190
  • Useful Addresses and Websites 192
  • References and Further Reading 196
  • Index 197
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