The Canoe and the Saddle: A Critical Edition

By Theodore Winthrop; Paul J. Lindholdt | Go to book overview

12. Lightning and Torchlight

A little before noon we left the hut of blue mud, the mission of Atinam. We forded the shallow river, and Ferdinand cheerily led the way straight up the steep hill-side. From its summit I could overlook, for farewell, the parallel ranges, walls of my three valleys of adventure. There were no forests over those vast arid mounds to narrow the view. Hills of Weenas, hills of Nachchese, valley of Atinam,—I took my last glance over their large monotony.

I might glance over the landscape, and recall my crowded life in it, only while the horses breathed after their climb, and no longer. If not eighty, certainly sixty miles away over the mountains is the Columbia, Achilles of rivers. And, says Ferdinand, “it must be a race all day with time, all night with time, a close race with time to-morrow.” If uncertainty of success is a condition of success, we shall win the race. But no dalliance, no staying to study landscape; we must on, steadily as the Princess Parazaide, whatever sermons there be in the stones along our way.1

-172-

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The Canoe and the Saddle: A Critical Edition
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Canoe and the Saddle a Critical Edition iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Note on the Text and Printing History xxix
  • Emendations xxxi
  • 1 - An Entrance 1
  • 2 - A Klalam Grandee 3
  • 3 - Whulge 15
  • 4 - Owhhigh 36
  • 5 - Forests of the Cascades 55
  • 6 - "Boston Tilicum" 77
  • 7 - Tacoma 86
  • 8 - Sowee House—Loolowcan 109
  • 9 - Via Mala 124
  • 10 - Treachery 136
  • 11 - Kamaiakan 150
  • 12 - Lightning and Torchlight 172
  • 13 - The Dalles—Their Legend 188
  • Notes 211
  • Bibliography 227
  • Index 231
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