Nebraska Moments

By Donald R. Hickey; Susan A. Wunder et al. | Go to book overview

28. Nebraska’s Literary Renaissance

On December i, 1925, an impromptu dinner was organized at the old Cornhusker Hotel in downtown Lincoln. It was a special occasion called by the superintendent of the Nebraska State Historical Society, Addison Sheldon. A community of writers that had evolved around the Cornhusker gathered to honor Bess Streeter Aldrich on the occasion of the publication of her first novel. Many of her new friends came. Although we do not have an exact record of who joined in a toast and good cheer that evening, it is probable that, in addition to the honoree, would-be young writers Mari Sandoz, Loren Eiseley, and Weldon Kees were in attendance. It had been a difficult year for the short story writer and new novelist from nearby Elmwood as Aldrich’s husband had died suddenly, and now she had to support four young children. But her friends and Sheldon had encouraged her, and here she was marking her own personal evolution as a writer.

From the 1920s to the 1950s, Nebraska provided the setting for an exponential growth of literature. A training ground for many creative individuals, writers gravitated toward this place on the Great Plains as the subject of their own reflections and stories. Such was the pattern for the Pulitzer-Prize winning Nebraskan Willa Cather. So too would it be for writers Bess Streeter Aldrich, Mari Sandoz, and John G. Neihardt, all leaders of Nebraska’s literary renaissance.

Bess Streeter Aldrich (1881–1954) celebrated the human spirit in her writings, and she featured intricate personal stories of Nebraska pioneers. Born Bessie Geneva Streeter in February 1881, she was the last of the eight children of Mary and James Streeter, both pioneers in central Iowa in the 1850s. The Streeters had farmed most of their lives until they moved to Cedar Falls, Iowa, just before Bess was born to her

-248-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nebraska Moments
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.