Nebraska Moments

By Donald R. Hickey; Susan A. Wunder et al. | Go to book overview

30. The Nebraska Home Front and World War II

OnChristmas Day—December 25, 1941—something happened in Nebraska that eventually startled and pleased the entire nation. The country was mobilizing for the war effort, and hundreds of soldiers and sailors needed to be transported by train to each of the coasts in order to fight World War II in Europe, Africa, and Asia. What a surprise it was for them to stop in North Platte for ten to twenty minutes to take on water and other supplies only to be greeted by friendly women, men, and children with welcoming smiles and baskets of free food, magazines, and treats. The local and area townspeople had decided to say “thank you” to all who were defending the country. At the Union Pacific Railroad depot on Front Street was born the North Platte Canteen, a place not to be forgotten by the thousands who would drop by during those next four years.

On December 7, 1941, a day that President Franklin Roosevelt told Americans “will live in infamy,” Japan attacked Pearl Harbor. Even before that fateful December morning, the United States had been moving closer and closer to a war footing with fascist Germany and Italy, and once their ally Japan attacked, war was imminent with the Axis Powers. The war declaration came the very next day from Congress and the president, and Americans prepared for the war effort. Nebraskans were not alone in wanting to do something to defend the United States, and although they resided in the center of the nation, their home front was no less patriotic.

The North Platte Canteen started because of a misunderstanding. Rumor had it that Nebraska National Guard Company D was on a train that was to stop in North Platte on December 17th, so people gathered at the depot to give the young soldiers presents as a send-off.

-271-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Nebraska Moments
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 403

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.