Reconnecting to Work: Policies to Mitigate Long-Term Unemployment and Its Consequences

By Lauren D. Appelbaum | Go to book overview

5
Work Together to Let
Everyone Work
A Study of the Cooperative Job-
Placement Effort in the Netherlands

Hilbrand Oldenhuis
Louis Polstra
Centre of Applied Labour Market Research and Innovation, Hanze University of Applied Sciences

“We work together to let everyone work.” That was the message in November 2010 when a number of employers and governmental organizations in the Netherlands publicly announced that they would cooperate with each other in order to let as many people participate in paid jobs as possible. From both an economic and a social perspective, it is clearly highly important to maximize the number of people that have paid jobs. At the end of 2008, the unemployment rate in the Netherlands was a historically low 2.7 percent. Dutch employers were having difficulties finding workers. As a result, companies were forced to cooperate with the Dutch government to fill their vacancies. However, for most employers in times of economic recession (the Dutch unemployment rate almost doubled between 2009 and 2010), decreasing the number of unemployed people will not be their highest priority.

Although on a national scale employers intend to cooperate with the government to reduce unemployment, it is not always the case for local governments. The local social services, which are responsible for local labor market policy, need information that would allow them to work more collaboratively with employers. More specifically, they wish to answer the question: Why would employers cooperate with social services by providing jobs to unemployed people via a social service agency? Two main reasons make this question a really important one to answer. First, social service agencies can use the answer in

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reconnecting to Work: Policies to Mitigate Long-Term Unemployment and Its Consequences
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.