Writing after Hitler: The Work of Jakov Lind

By Andrea Hammel; Silke Hassler et al. | Go to book overview

Preface

Following the publication of Austria 1945–1955: Studies in Political and Cultural Re-emergence, the University of Wales Press now devotes a volume of essays to a writer whose connection with Austria may, at first sight, appear only circumstantial. Jakov Lind, born in Vienna, has spent most of his adult and literary life outside his native Austria, from which he, as a Jew, had had to flee from persecution after the German occupation of Austria in 1938. The association would appear to grow even weaker when we consider how he subsequently opted to change language and to write his later works in his newly acquired language, English. Yet, just as the first decade after the Second World War was to be a defining moment in the literary and cultural course of the re-established Austrian republic, setting it initially on a conservative path, so the experience of cultural exile and linguistic displacement may be said to be a major and defining element within Austrian letters in the middle of the twentieth century with lasting influence on the later course of post-war Austrian literature. The advent of National Socialism in Austria not only drove hundreds of established authors into exile but along with them also a whole generation of younger men, women and even children like Lind, who would subsequently become writers. Of course, artists, musicians and intellectuals of all disciplines also suffered this displacement, but it was most pronounced and painful in those for whom language was the creative medium.

This collection of essays, although concentrating on the particular and unique nature of a specific writer whose work now receives detailed attention, stands too as a representative of that whole-scale phenomenon of displacement. It is hoped that these essays by leading scholars in their field will deepen our understanding of the work of Jakov Lind and, at the same time, prove a useful addition to our understanding of exile, of remembrance, of the literary treatment of National Socialism by those who survived its horrors,

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Writing after Hitler: The Work of Jakov Lind
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.