Writing after Hitler: The Work of Jakov Lind

By Andrea Hammel; Silke Hassler et al. | Go to book overview

5
At War with Language:
From The Diary of Hanan Malinek to
Travels to the Enu

EDWARD TIMMS

DURING the late 1930s over 10,000 unaccompanied children succeeded in escaping from Nazi-occupied Europe with the Kindertransporte. In many cases they had to come to terms not only with the traumatic loss of their parents, but also with a less tangible form of deprivation: the loss of their mother tongue. To ensure that the children assimilated quickly, the British refugee committees ‘encouraged them to drop their German language’.1 The children were expected to learn English, acquire fresh social skills, change their names and develop a new identity. In many cases they also found themselves alienated from their Jewish faith.2 These pressures meant that they had to draw a veil over the past, leaving their early memories in limbo. Some of them remained silent for fifty years, until the first reunion of the Kindertransporte, held in London in June 1989, helped to loosen their tongues. ‘Silence was endemic to my generation’, one of the survivors recalled.3

The children who travelled to England were the fortunate ones. Approximately 1,500 unaccompanied Jewish children were resettled in the Netherlands, and these young people found themselves trapped when the country was occupied by the German army in May 1940. Among them was a thirteen-year-old boy from Vienna named Heinz Landwirth, later to become known as the writer Jakov Lind. He was able to survive under the German occupation by becoming so fluent in Dutch that he was able to conceal his original identity. But the loss of rapport with his mother tongue was to have lasting consequences for his career as a writer. In the first volume of his autobiography, Counting My Steps, Lind sums up his position at

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Writing after Hitler: The Work of Jakov Lind
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 223

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.