Keys to the Marketplace: Problems and Issues in Cultural and Heritage Tourism

By Patricia Atkinson Wells | Go to book overview

1
DOING RIGHT BY THE LOCAL FOLKS:
GRASSROOTS ISSUES IN CULTURAL TOURISM

ROBERT COGSWELL

On the surface, tourism appears to be a simple proposition, especially for communities newly interested in entering alternative tourism markets: outsiders, in response to promotional encouragement, visit an out-of-the-way locale and spend money. This is, no doubt, an attractive scenario for communities hard-pressed for other avenues of economic development, promising to inject new money into the local economy with little capital investment.

But in many ways, tourism development is not so simple as it appears, for it entails a great deal more than conventional business concerns. Its pitfalls and controversies have made news on many levels. In Egypt, Islamic fundamentalists, incited by tourist behaviors that conflict with their own cultural codes, have waged a terrorist campaign against foreign visitors with disastrous results for that country’s tourism industry (“When taming…” 1992; Gubernick 1993; Fletcher 1993; “Staying Away…” 1994). In south Florida, highly publicized crimes against international tourists have created a similar crisis (Fedarko 1993; Stoker 1993). In Virginia, the proposal for development of the Disney America theme park on the Mananas battlefield site has recently sparked public debate over appropriate uses of culturally significant properties and interpretations of heritage subject matter (Abney 1994; Wiener 1994). Here in Tennessee, the thriving tourism destination in Sevier County has received criticism for the pay levels and seasonality of its employment opportunities, the pressures it exerts on community infrastructures, and the tourist dollars that do not remain locally (M. Smith 1989; Humphrey 1989; Amow 1991).

As locales outside of Tennessee’s established tourist centers pursue tourism opportunities, governmental, free enterprise, and not-for-profit entities need to be realistic about the potentials for both problems and benefits in tourism development. The alternative approach of “cultural” or “heritage” tourism has spawned a new wave of interest in cultivating smaller-scale and out-of-the-way markets. In the few years since these terms have entered tourism lingo, they have come to encompass a range of tourism motives differing from the more conventional incentives of recreational and scenic (or “eco-”) tourism. They have brought new history, arts, and humanities connections into the tourism mix and opened the way for the packaging of old buildings, mom-and-pop

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Keys to the Marketplace: Problems and Issues in Cultural and Heritage Tourism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 142

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.