Keys to the Marketplace: Problems and Issues in Cultural and Heritage Tourism

By Patricia Atkinson Wells | Go to book overview

3
THE HERITAGE EMBROGLIO: QUAGMIRES OF
POLITICS, ECONOMICS, AND “TRADITION”

CLODAGH BRENNAN HARVEY

Even as recently as ten years ago the traveler to Ireland, or any intrepid soul with a mission there, might easily find himself or herself on a solitary journey in the countryside, braving unpredictable weather conditions, challenging unyielding terrain, or charting an untrodden path in the pursuit, following perhaps the meandering directions provided by some helpful, loquacious native. Indeed, the pristine beauty of Ireland’s countryside, the quietude, the sense of space and privacy that it affords, the friendliness of its inhabitants, and the antiquity of its traditions and way of life, have long been among the most salient aspects of Ireland’s appeal and of its promotion in tourist literature, both at home and abroad.1 Tourism has played a central role in Ireland’s economy and in its cultural life for well over a century (O’Connor 1993b:69) and promises to have an even greater impact in the future; the steady, continuing development of international tourism indicates that it may well become the world’s largest single source of employment by the end of this decade (O’Connor 1993a: 1).

One result of this economic trend is the remarkable number of representations of Ireland’s material and nonmaterial culture which have emerged in the last decade in both urban and rural settings, and ever more frequently (although not invariably) in response to the demands—and the financial inducements— of the tourist industry. Heritage and interpretive centers, museums and theme parks, summer schools and festivals of almost every description, and extremely sophisticated, pyrotechnical amusements depicting aspects of Irish history and “tradition” now confront visitor and native alike at almost every turn.2 This sudden outcropping of heritage attractions has met with almost universal opposition from museum professionals, historians, archaeologists, literary scholars, and other cultural specialists. Most frequently, such opposition is based upon the putative inauthenticity of many heritage attractions and upon the trivialization, over-simplification, or commodification of culture or history that they may represent. While these concerns are certainly legitimate, they represent merely the tip of the heritage iceberg: under the surface the enticements of heritage funding have often set individuals, institutions, and political bodies scrambling with each other over limited goods, frequently rushing to implement potentially ill-conceived, short-sighted projects with no guarantee of on

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Keys to the Marketplace: Problems and Issues in Cultural and Heritage Tourism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 142

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.