The Papers of Robert A. Taft: 1889-1939 - Vol. 1

By Robert A. Taft; Clarence E. Wunderlin, Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
Campaigning for Hoover (1919–1920)
After ten months with the American Relief Administration in Paris, Taft welcomed the opportunity to return to the United States, to his family, and to the practice of law. After stops in New York and Canada, Taft went home to Cincinnati.1Free from the confines of Maxwell and Ramsey, Taft began by practicing law alone, initially renting space in another attorney’s office. Once again he depended on family and friends for that all-important initial boost. He built his practice around the supervision of Charles P. Taft s legal affairs, on the management of the Herron family’s Royer Wheel Company, and on the connections he made in college, law school, and government service. But the practice of law, regardless of the financial reward, was less than satisfying. After his close association with Herbert Hoover and repelled by the party’s frontrunners, Taft jumped at the chance to campaign for his former boss’s nomination as the Republican candidate for president in 1920. When the Hoover boom went bust, he made his own bid for elective office, successfully campaigning for the state legislature.2
1. RT to Martha B. Taft, telegram, Sept. 13, 1919, LC/WHTP.
2. Patterson, Mr. Republican, 85–86.

TO WILLIAM H. TAFT

October 12, [1919]
Cincinnati, [Ohio]

Dear Papa —

This is the only paper I can find in the house, so I hope you will excuse its use.1 I wrote Misch yesterday asking him to get me a Yale catalogue, and it

-209-

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