Jiménez de Cisneros: On the Threshold of Spain's Golden Age

By Erika Rummel | Go to book overview

Preface

It is indicative of the dearth of English literature on Cisneros’ life that a recent publication cites as “the most judicious account” a chapter in a Spanish book on Erasmus (M. Bataillon’s Erasmo y España, Mexico 1966, cited by Bentley, p. 70). Similarly, an entry on Cisneros in a biographical dictionary (Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation, Toronto 1986) lists three biographies, respectively dating from 1851 (by Hefele, written in German, available in English translation), 1914 (by Lyell, in English), and 1930 (by Fernández de Retana, in Spanish). The most recent biography in English is W. Starkie’s Grand Inquisitor: Being an Account of Cardinal Ximénez de Cisneros and His Times (London, 1940). Clearly, there is a lack of biographies for English readers. In Spanish literature, by contrast, Cisneros has received a great deal of attention. A plethora of books and articles has appeared in the last twenty years, ranging from Cruz Martínez Esteruelas’ popular paperback, Cisneros, de presidario a rey (Barcelona, 1992) to José García Oro’s scholarly study, El Cardenal Cisneros (2 volumes, Madrid, 1992–93). The majority of these publications are, however, meant for specialists. García Oro’s book provides an account that covers the full scope of Cisneros’ activities, but it assumes a thorough knowledge of the period and is burdened with minute detail. For an undergraduate readership it is labyrinthine. Other Spanish accounts deal with specific aspects of Cisneros’ career, most often related to his activities as a churchman. In an earlier work, Cisneros y la reforma del clero español … (Madrid, 1971) García Oro addresses Cisneros’ reform programme; P. Sainz Rodríguez treats of the same subject, with particular attention to Cisneros’ inclination to mysticism, in La siembra mística del Cardenal Cisneros y las reformas en la iglesia (Madrid, 1979). The most recent collection of papers dedicated exclusively to Cisneros is La hora de Cisneros, edited by Joseph Pérez (Madrid, 1995).

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Jiménez de Cisneros: On the Threshold of Spain's Golden Age
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 152

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.