Into the Mouths of Babes: An Anthology of Children's Abolitionist Literature

By Deborah C. De Rosa | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

LITTLE OF THE RECOVERY WORK of abolitionist juvenile literature would have been possible without the financial assistance of the Elizabeth Cady Stanton Foundation, the W. Bruce Lea Family, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Off-Campus Graduate Research Grant, the Cairns Friends of Library at Madison Wisconsin Fellowship, the Barnard Alumnae Graduate Fellowship, the Senior Fellowship at the University of North Carolina, and the Graduate Council Research and Artistry Grant for the Summer 2001 from Northern Illinois University. These works were located in the archives at the Schomburg Collection, the Widener and Houghton Libraries at Harvard University, the Boston Athenaeum, the American Antiquarian Society, the Library Company of Philadelphia, and the Cairns Women’s Collection at the University of Madison, Wisconsin.

I would like to acknowledge James Peltz (editor in chief) and Jennie R. Doling (rights and permissions editor) at SUNY Press for allowing me to exercise the fair use policy regarding the materials I discussed in Domestic Abolitionism and Juvenile Literature, 1830–1860 (2003). Thanks must also go to the Dean of Liberal Arts and Science and the English Department at Northern Illinois University for providing the funding needed to obtain permissions and to reproduce the images included in this volume.

My sincere gratitude goes to Suzanne Staszak-Silva (and her new bundle of joy) at Greenwood Press, whose faith in this project brought it to completion. Karyn Slutsky’s amazing attention to detail has resulted in a more accurate and complete volume.

This anthology also grew out of great patience from friends and colleagues who helped me to complete the challenging work of comparing

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