Into the Mouths of Babes: An Anthology of Children's Abolitionist Literature

By Deborah C. De Rosa | Go to book overview

JULIA COLMAN AND
MATILDA G. THOMPSON
(BIOGRAPHIES AND DATES UNKNOWN)

Julia Colman and Matilda Thompson’s work, The Child’s Anti-Slavery Book: Containing a Few Words about American Slave Children, and Stories of Slave-Life (1859) represents a complex and interesting collection of recovered juvenile abolitionist texts published on the eve of the Civil War. Its three short stories, “Little Lewis: The Story of a Slave Boy,” “Mark and Hasty; or, Slave-Life in Missouri,” and “Aunt Judy’s Story: A Story from Real Life”1 suggest that on the eve of the national strife, Colman and Thompson (about whom no biographical information has surfaced)2 felt confident walking the tightrope as women authors of abolitionist texts that depict slavery as un-Christian and un-American.

Claiming to have their origins in true stories, these sentimental, juvenile pseudoslave-narratives capture the psychological distress that slave children as well as their mothers and fathers experience. Echoing authentic slave narratives such as Frederick Douglass, The Autobiography of Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs, Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Colman and Thompson’s stories describe the conditions of servitude, in particular its violation of family bonds; the events that lead to a child’s awakening of his or her status as a slave; the emotional crisis and ramifications of this awakening; and the process by which the child attains freedom.

Matilda Thompson’s “Mark and Hasty” and Julia Colman’s “Little Lewis” achieve an unparalleled level of complexity in the portrayal of the slave family unit, its rupture, and the stalwart efforts that slave parents make to protect their child’s best interests. “Mark and Hasty” is the only abolitionist text recovered to date that begins with a complete slave family unit: Mark (father), Hasty (mother), and Fanny (daughter). However, both “Mark and Hasty” and “Little Lewis” document the slave mother’s

-313-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Into the Mouths of Babes: An Anthology of Children's Abolitionist Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.