The Performance of Performance Standards

By James J. Heckman; Carolyn J. Heinrich et al. | Go to book overview

1
Performance Standards and
the Potential to Improve
Government Performance

James J. Heckman
Carolyn J. Heinrich
Jeffrey Smith

A number of recently implemented reforms to public sector incentive systems have sought to reorient them toward a focus on measuring results and inducing public agencies to become more efficient, responsive, and accountable to the public. They share at least two features. The first is a system of performance measures and standards designed to create clear expectations for government performance and to assess results. A second feature is a means for rewarding individuals, teams, or entire organizations for achievement relative to the established performance goals, primarily through budgetary allocations. By clearly defining goals and developing explicit rewards for their attainment, these systems have aimed to replicate, in a nonmarket setting, the incentive structures, competition, and resulting high performance and efficiency of private markets (Light 2005).

Among its first steps in advancing these reforms, the Obama administration has required federal agencies to identify a limited number of high-priority performance goals for which performance trends will be tracked, and through its new Open Government initiative, it will make these data publicly available and promote the use of new methods in the analysis of them. The government is also now compelling the private sector to provide more information on its performance for transparency and accountability (beyond longer-standing areas of public scrutiny such as health care and the environment), and has devised incentives for cooperation and penalties for withholding information (Cukier 2010). For example, it is now possible for the public to get sta-

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Performance of Performance Standards
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 330

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.