Chases and Escapes: The Mathematics of Pursuit and Evasion

By Paul J. Nahin | Go to book overview

Introducation

“Chases and escapes” are activities that might be said to define human existence, no matter where or when, ranging over the entire spectrum of violence from the romantic pursuit of a future spouse to the military pursuit of a target to be destroyed. Young children are introduced to both chases and escapes when they learn the simple rules of the game of tag: played by at least two, one player is designated as it, who then chases after all the others, who, of course, attempt to escape. When the it player manages to catch one of the evaders he or she yells “Tag! You’re it!,” that evader and the pursuer change roles, and the game continues until all drop from exhaustion. Parents love tag! The related game of hide-and-seek, also of this genre, is equally attractive to young children (and to their parents). And surely all readers can remember the fun of watching the old Looney Tunes Road Runner/Wile E. Coyote chase-and-escape cartoons. Hollywood’s interest in chases dates, in fact, at least as far back as the 1914 serial The Perils of Pauline, with countless imaginative escapes by the heroine from her dastardly guardian’s attempts to do her in.

As we grow older we leave hide-and-seek, tag, and cartoons behind, but there remains, for most people, a deep interest in pursuit-andevasion; the fascination simply becomes more sophisticated. The inherent conflict of chasing and escaping, of the battle between the hunter and the hunted, is the basis for at least half the fictional writing in the world. By their high school years, for example, most students

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Chases and Escapes: The Mathematics of Pursuit and Evasion
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 254

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.