The Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought

By Gerhard Bowering | Go to book overview

Topical List of Entries

Central Themes

Historical Developments, Sects and Schools, Regions and Dynasties

Modern Concepts, Institutions, Movements, and Parties

Islamic Law and Traditional Islamic Societies

Thinkers, Personalities, and Statesmen


Central Themes

Edited by Gerhard Bowering

authority

caliph, caliphate

fundamentalism

government

jihad

knowledge

minorities

modernity

Muhammad (570– 632)

pluralism and tolerance

Qur’an

revival and reform

shari’a

traditional political thought

‘ulama’


Historical developments, Sects and
Schools, Regions and dynasties

Edited by Patricia Crone

Dynasties

Abbasids (750– 1258)

Almohads (1130– 1269)

Almoravids (1056– 1147)

Ayyubids (1169– 1250)

Buyids (945–1062)

Delhi Sultanate (1206– 1526)

Fatimids (909– 1171)

Ghaznavids (977– 1086)

Ghurids (1009– 1215)

Ilkhanids (1256– 1336)

Mamluks (1250– 1517)

Mughals (1526– 1857)

Ottomans (1299–1924)

Safavids (1501– 1722)

Samanids (819– 1005)

Seljuqs (1055– 1194)

Timurids (1370– 1506)

Umayyads (661– 750)


Historical Developments

alliances

bazaar

Brethren of Purity

city (philosophical)

civil war

clients

coinage

Crusades

difference of opinion

excommunication

ghāzī

heresiography

heresy and innovation

hypocrisy

inquisition

Mongols

philosophy

privacy

Qajars (1789–1925)

Rightly Guided Caliphate (632– 61)

shāhānshāh

Shahnama

solidarity

theology

Thousand and One Nights

trade and commerce

usurper


Regions

Afghanistan

Algeria

Baghdad

Bangladesh

Beirut

Cairo

Central Asia

China

Delhi

East Africa

Egypt

Ethiopia and Eritrea

Europe

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Istanbul

Jerusalem

Jordan

Karbala

Lebanon

Malaysia

Mecca and Medina

Morocco

Nigeria

North Africa

North America

Pakistan

Palestine

Saudi Arabia

South Africa

Southeast Asia

Spain and Portugal (Andalus)

Sudan

Syria

Transoxiana

Tunisia

Turkey

West Africa

Yemen


Sects and Schools

‘Alawis

Ash’aris

Barelwis

Berbers

Druze

Ibadis

Isma’ilis

Kadızadeli

Karramis

Kharijis

Murji’is

Mu’tazilis

Nizaris

Qadaris

Qarmatians

Shi’ism

Shu’ubis

Sufism

Sunnism

Uighurs

Zahiris

Zaydis

-xxv-

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The Princeton Encyclopedia of Islamic Political Thought
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Alphabetical List of Entries xxi
  • Topical List of Entries xxv
  • Contributors xxix
  • A 1
  • B 60
  • C 80
  • D 125
  • E 141
  • F 164
  • G 189
  • H 211
  • I 230
  • J 268
  • K 292
  • L 313
  • M 320
  • N 385
  • O 401
  • P 404
  • Q 440
  • R 457
  • S 480
  • T 539
  • U 573
  • V 587
  • W 592
  • Y 600
  • Z 603
  • Index 607
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