Assessing the Value of U.S. Army International Activities

By Jefferson P. Marquis; Richard E. Darilek et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ONE
Introduction

During the Cold War, U.S. national security policymakers had a single major objective: to contain the Soviet Union. U.S. Army forces were optimized to deter and, if necessary, defeat the Warsaw Pact adversaries in Central Europe, and Army International Activities (AIA) were focused on furthering this objective through cooperation with allies in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). The post–Cold War strategic environment is more complex, however. Today, adversaries are often non-state entities, and operations feature coalitions of the willing, composed of both long-time allies and new partners, with a wide range of military strengths and weaknesses.

Such an environment has required that the Department of Defense (DoD) develop a more flexible and comprehensive security cooperation1 strategy. The first step in this direction occurred in 1998 when Prioritized Regional Objectives in the Contingency Planning Guidance were expanded into Theater Engagement Plans. The second major step was the publication by the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), in 2003, of the first Security Cooperation Guidance,

1 As employed by officials in the George W. Bush administration, security cooperation includes many, but not all, non-combat interactions between the U.S. Department of Defense and foreign military establishments: e.g., foreign military sales (FMS) and training, senior officer visits, and materiel technical cooperation. The term peacetime engagement, as used in the Clinton administration, was defined more broadly than security cooperation. The purpose of engagement was to shape the security environment, and its missions often included positioning U.S. military forces overseas and humanitarian and peacekeeping operations.

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Assessing the Value of U.S. Army International Activities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxiii
  • Acronyms xxvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Measuring the Performance of Government Programs 11
  • Chapter Three - AIA Ends and Ways 21
  • Chapter Four - Linking Ways to Ends 37
  • Chapter Five - Army International Activities Knowledge Sharing System 53
  • Chapter Six - AIA Test Cases 71
  • Chapter Seven - Concluding Observations 95
  • Appendix- AIA Performance Indicators 107
  • Bibliography 139
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