Assessing the Value of U.S. Army International Activities

By Jefferson P. Marquis; Richard E. Darilek et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
AIA Test Cases

Introduction

Initial feedback from AIA personnel gathered in the first year of our assessment research in 2003 indicated broad understanding of, and support for, our general approach. However, there were also important questions raised about its implementation, several of which were mentioned in the previous chapter. This chapter presents three test cases that were used to explore the utility and feasibility of our AIA assessment method and collection/reporting tool. The test cases were the U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD), the U.S. National Guard Bureau’s State Partnership Program, and U.S. Army South (USARSO). Although these cases did not represent a comprehensive validation of our approach, they offered useful insights to support the Army’s implementation of AIAKSS.

Two basic criteria guided our selection of test cases.1 Primarily, we wanted cases that varied in their institutional structure to help us understand the broad spectrum of organizations that implement AIA programs and provide us insights into how different organizations report AIA data. Secondarily, we sought test cases that would capture differences in regional and functional perspectives. AMEDD, SPP, and USARSO appeared to meet these criteria. First, they share few

1 We endeavored to follow the sound selection advice found in Van Evera (1997); King, Keohane, and Verba (1994); and George and McKeown (1985, pp. 43–68).

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Assessing the Value of U.S. Army International Activities
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures xi
  • Tables xiii
  • Summary xv
  • Acknowledgments xxiii
  • Acronyms xxvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Measuring the Performance of Government Programs 11
  • Chapter Three - AIA Ends and Ways 21
  • Chapter Four - Linking Ways to Ends 37
  • Chapter Five - Army International Activities Knowledge Sharing System 53
  • Chapter Six - AIA Test Cases 71
  • Chapter Seven - Concluding Observations 95
  • Appendix- AIA Performance Indicators 107
  • Bibliography 139
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