Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women

By Psiche Hughes | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
Violation of the Love Story

The love story has traditionally been associated with women’s fiction, especially in Latin American countries where its representation has up to the middle of the last century been confined to romantic situations delicately and sensitively portrayed. In a society dominated by Catholicism, women’s sexuality had to be sanctified by marriage, when not repressed, and therefore confined to the domestic scene and procreation. Consequently, its literary expression avoided physical terminology, let alone anything that could be construed as erotic. Erotic and later pornographic language was the province of men.

More recently, however, women have broken away from this tradition and launched into more explicit and outspoken descriptions of sexual behavior, abandoning the code of “decency” originally imposed upon their literary language. Some women have even gone further, including the writers whose works figure here: by breaking with the conventional patterns they have violated the whole concept of the “love story,” along with the very notion of traditional love. I am referring to violation in both its objective and subjective senses: love as victim of social restraints and love as threatening existing social and psychological structures. The stories by Latin American women presented in this collection have been selected because they are different and exciting, and they illustrate the various forms in which this violation occurs.

The concepts of transgression and violation, certainly in the tradition established by the French writer Georges Bataille (1897– 1962), are linked to the Law. They are concerned with exceeding the limits or bounds prescribed by laws, whether explicit or im-

-xv-

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Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction - Violation of the Love Story xv
  • To Love or to Ingest 1
  • English Love 9
  • The Fall 17
  • The Sea from the Window 33
  • Young Amatista 39
  • Farewell, My Love 49
  • Immensely Eunice 57
  • Golden Days of a Queen of Diamonds 67
  • In Florence Ten Years Later 91
  • Love Story 99
  • Aunt Mariana 111
  • Procession of Love 117
  • Santa Catalina, Arequipa 125
  • Impossible Story 143
  • Spick and Span 149
  • End of the Millennium 157
  • Source Acknowledgments 181
  • Contributors 183
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