Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women

By Psiche Hughes | Go to book overview

English Love

MARGO GLANTZ

M came on Sunday – no, not Sunday, Saturday. There I was, Nora García, eating with my mother, when the black dog – a chow chow – howls and warns us that something is there, under the door. The maid picks it up and hands it to me; it’s probably one of those advertisements trying to sex up the sale of a fridge, Christmas fare, or the installation of an intercom, I tell myself. But I am wrong. It is a letter (a love letter?), unsealed, on ordinary paper; the characters are precise, formal. Impeccable. Legible English writing, the result of patient work and of the rulers that public-school teachers or matrons used to punish little boys whose letters lacked elegance, neatness, and precision. (If only I had had such a teacher! It’s enough to look at my writing to understand why.) The note starts with the usual formula: Dear Nora.

I don’t take much notice. I see that it’s a strange declaration of love – of a rather literary kind – that, to make matters worse, or better (according to how one looks at it), alludes to a book by Graham Greene, Travels with My Aunt, as if I knew it. It seems that such an aunt was very much like me. Had nobody told me? No, of course, any resemblance with any aunt is purely coincidental. Given the situation, I go on eating and paying attention to the frustrated idyll of my dogs. She is still small, very excitable, a lion cub, affectionate and greedy; he is black, bony, with tousled fur. She’s in heat, he’s in love. Unfortunately, they’re separated, like Tristan and Isolde. They look at each other through the windowpane, yelp, scratch, whine, breaking my heart. I look at my letter with nostalgia, nothing romantic in it, nothing like the medieval passion that my dogs are living now, flesh and blood. My little

-9-

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Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction - Violation of the Love Story xv
  • To Love or to Ingest 1
  • English Love 9
  • The Fall 17
  • The Sea from the Window 33
  • Young Amatista 39
  • Farewell, My Love 49
  • Immensely Eunice 57
  • Golden Days of a Queen of Diamonds 67
  • In Florence Ten Years Later 91
  • Love Story 99
  • Aunt Mariana 111
  • Procession of Love 117
  • Santa Catalina, Arequipa 125
  • Impossible Story 143
  • Spick and Span 149
  • End of the Millennium 157
  • Source Acknowledgments 181
  • Contributors 183
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