Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women

By Psiche Hughes | Go to book overview

End of the Millennium

LUISA VALENZUELA


Him

He has so many possibilities: he can blow his fortune in one night in Paris or New York, or he can go to Fiji, the first place in the whole world where the third millennium will start. It is up to him. He will not be able to find a room in any hotel, but that does not matter; he does not need one. He has been looking it up, exploring it on the Internet, and knows all the prices, packages, and tricks. He can dispose of more than seventeen thousand dollars without it having an impact on his family – they do not even know it exists – and this sum should be more than enough.

In front of him there are photos of himself; what is not there is a mirror: he even shaves by memory. Little by little, since he has been living alone, he has eliminated all reflecting surfaces from his apartment. In the photos on his desk – he was thirty then – he looks very handsome. Now, at more than twice that age, he has considerably less hair, white, of course, which he can see on the comb, although he tries to use it as little as possible. He writes a lot, but what he writes is a distorted autobiography, somewhat apocryphal, of that blessed age of thirty, and he has decided to remain frozen at that happy stage of his life, fixed in time. He resolved to do this three years ago and, being thirty, has become his new persona for the many temporary relationships he has formed on the Internet. All beautiful and crisp – unless they also lie – some even interesting. With these he persists the longest, meeting them every night on the screen of his computer, until some white hair or a wrinkle inevitably appears in his recent photos. To keep up with his persona, he must become a year older, and this he cannot bear. So he breaks the relationship outright. He gets rid of this

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Violations: Stories of Love by Latin American Women
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction - Violation of the Love Story xv
  • To Love or to Ingest 1
  • English Love 9
  • The Fall 17
  • The Sea from the Window 33
  • Young Amatista 39
  • Farewell, My Love 49
  • Immensely Eunice 57
  • Golden Days of a Queen of Diamonds 67
  • In Florence Ten Years Later 91
  • Love Story 99
  • Aunt Mariana 111
  • Procession of Love 117
  • Santa Catalina, Arequipa 125
  • Impossible Story 143
  • Spick and Span 149
  • End of the Millennium 157
  • Source Acknowledgments 181
  • Contributors 183
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