Surviving Conquest: A History of the Yavapai Peoples

By Timothy Braatz | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

Following the wise and bold example of Howard Zinn, I begin by acknowledging my biases. I am not a Yavapai, and this book probably suffers for it. I have tried to describe the past as the historical record presents it. However, I have strong opinions about right and wrong, and they have influenced the choices I have made and the questions I have asked. Like Albert Hurtado, I pull for the underdog. Like Wilbur Jacobs, I believe a historian at work has certain moral responsibilities. The reader should know that I denounce the U.S. government’s shameful tradition of expansionism, conquest, racism, militarism, and imperialism. Regarding American Indian peoples, some U.S. policies have been and continue to be genocidal. With Ward Churchill, I believe that the U.S. government’s claim to most of its national territory is, by its own laws and precepts, illegal and illegitimate. This is not to say that North America before 1776 or 1492 was free of violence, cruelty, ethnocentrism, and injustice; it was not. But in this day and age, when monied interests, the owners of press and television, and the politicians who work for them bombard the American public with an ideology of American greatness, inevitability, and moral superiority, historians should resist the rewards and security of obedient conformity and attempt to set the record straight. That is what I believe, and those beliefs color the way I have interpreted in this book the history that played out in the region now called Arizona.

-ix-

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Surviving Conquest: A History of the Yavapai Peoples
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A Note on Terminology xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Early Yavapai World 25
  • 2 - The Yavapai World Invaded 53
  • 3 - The Yavapai World Undone 85
  • 4 - Creating a New World 145
  • 5 - Homelands 195
  • Abbreviations 233
  • Notes 237
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 295
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