Surviving Conquest: A History of the Yavapai Peoples

By Timothy Braatz | Go to book overview

A Note on Terminology

This is a history of four Upland Yuman–speaking peoples—Tolkepayas, Yavapés, Wipukepas, Kwevkepayas—who have become known, collectively and misleadingly, as Yavapais. For simplicity, the term Yavapai is used here to indicate the four peoples in general and when vagueness in the historical record prevents distinguishing among the different groups. Numerous spellings, without codification, exist for the names of the four peoples. The spellings given here reflect the pronunciations of Molly Starr Fasthorse, a Tolkepaya speaker, but make no claim to orthographic authority. Similarly, the names of nineteenth-century Yavapais, such as Quashackama and Ohatchecama, take various forms in the historical record, and the choices applied here may not be the best. Regarding chronology, early and preconquest refer to Yavapais and Yavapai lifeways after the decline of the Verde Valley pueblo communities, in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, and before the upheaval caused in the 1860s and 1870s by the American invasion and takeover of Yavapai lands. However, as should be clear, the peoples and societies of what is now called central Arizona were neither static nor frozen in time before European contact or American conquest; the idea of aboriginal or “traditional” cultures is a dubious construct. Arizona became a United States territory in 1863 and a state in 1912, but as employed here, Arizona also means the same geographical region before these political developments. For lack of better terminology, and with apologies to the rest of the Western Hemisphere, American primarily refers in this book to the United States and its citizens. For the period after 1848, however, American may identify any nonIndian individuals, including European immigrants and Mexicans, who appear in Yavapai lands; and, where used, Mexican denotes Spanish-speakers who may be Mexican citizens or U.S. citizens of Mexican descent. Sorting out these individual ethnic and national identities with regard to late nineteenth-century Arizona is difficult, at times impossible, and would probably contribute little to a broader understanding of the Yavapai past.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Surviving Conquest: A History of the Yavapai Peoples
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • A Note on Terminology xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Early Yavapai World 25
  • 2 - The Yavapai World Invaded 53
  • 3 - The Yavapai World Undone 85
  • 4 - Creating a New World 145
  • 5 - Homelands 195
  • Abbreviations 233
  • Notes 237
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 295
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.