Scotland and the Great War

By Catriona M. M. Macdonald; E. W. McFarland | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Confrontation and Withdrawal:
Loos, Readership and
‘The First Hundred Thousand’

Gordon Urquhart

“It’s a tremendous opportunity for our section of’K(l),’”
continued Wagstaffe. “We shall have a chance of making
history over this, old man.”

… Then suddenly his reserved, undemonstrative
Scottish tongue found utterance.

“Scotland for Ever!” he cried softly.1

THE GREAT WAR has been cited as the catalyst for the birth of modernism and the revival of Scottish literature which centred on MacDiarmid, Gunn and others. This Scottish Literary Renaissance was, however, one of ‘high art’ and dealt with the war in retrospect. The present chapter concerns itself with literature reflecting contemporary popular sensibilities, which offered the reading public current representations of the Scot at war. J.J. Bell, already established as a story teller of some renown, added to his ‘Wee MacGreegor’ sequence with, Wee MacGreegor Enlists, recently republished.2 Although less remembered, the work of Captain R. W. Campbell was well-received at the time: his Glaswegian character ‘Spud Tamson’ became, according to Moira Burgess, ‘a national figure for a time.’3

This chapter focuses on another writer with Edinburgh—rather than Glasgow—connections, albeit with an international reputation. John Hay Beith had been a schoolmaster at Fettes Academy and was an occasional contributor, as ‘Ian Hay’, to Blackwood’s Magazine. After giving up teaching to concentrate on writing, he proceeded to add to his reputation as a light novelist. Already a territorial army officer since 1908, he enlisted in the 10th Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders on the outbreak of war. This unit, pseudonymously ‘The Bruce and Wallace Highlanders’, was to provide the backdrop for his most famous novel,

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Scotland and the Great War
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.