Arab Christians in British Mandate Palestine: Communalism and Nationalism, 1917-1948

By Noah Haiduc-Dale | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

A series of experiences led me to study Middle East history, and without the Revd John Patterson, Elias Jabbour, Larry Penrose and Steve Tamari I would never have become interested in the Palestinian–Israeli conflict; without Jeff Tyler, I probably would not have become a historian. Thank you. My studies at the University of Arizona and New York University prepared me for the task of writing this book, and a number of professors guided me through those years. Charles D. Smith at the University of Arizona, and Zachary Lockman, Khalid Fahmy and Fred Cooper at NYU deserve special thanks, as well as Ellen Fleischmann. Funding from NYU and the Fulbright–Hayes programme made my travels possible, while the actual research was facilitated by assistance from numerous librarians and archivists. Various scholars in Palestine helped me to ask the right questions and guided me towards the best sources, among them Hillel Cohen, Adnan Musallam, Bernard Sabella and Salim Tamari. Thanks to the participants in the scholarship group at Waynesburg for keeping me motivated, Jill Sunday for polishing my writing, and Cori Schiplani for assisting with images and creating the wonderful maps. Other colleagues helped indirectly at various stages: without Jonathan Gribetz and On Barak, my research would have been far less enjoyable. Nicola Ramsey, Rebecca Mackenzie and Michelle Houston at Edinburgh University Press have been both patient and helpful answering my many questions along the way.

My family has been wonderfully supportive. Thank you to my parents, Steve and Wendy Dale, and my in-laws, George and Violet Haiduc, for their love and encouragement. Most important has been the patience and support of my wife, Michelle, who accompanied me across the world and back and has supported me in so many ways. She and our children, Maia, Asher and Ethan, who arrived at various points along the way, have kept me motivated through long days of research and writing.

-vii-

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