US Environmental History: Inviting Doomsday

By John Wills | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN
Disney/Disnature and the End of the Organic

When Italian philosopher Umberto Eco travelled the United States in the 1970s, he visited two versions of New Orleans. One constructed over hundreds of years by white colonists and black slaves. The other constructed in a few months by Walt Disney Imagineers. Part of the entertainment landscape of California’s Disneyland, the hyperreal, cartoonised New Orleans impressed Eco far more than the authentic, historic city of the South. Seeing animatronic alligators on the Disney Mississippi but no live specimens near New Orleans, Eco imparted: ‘Disneyland tells us that technology can give us more reality than nature can’.1

Americans have always manipulated and simulated nature. Even national parks, venerated ‘wilderness landscapes’, amounted to spectacularly constructed nature experiences in the early 1900s, marked by predator-control campaigns, superabundant prey numbers and elaborate tourist provisions. Historic simulations of nature include Carl Hagenbeck’s zoo dioramas of the 1890s and ‘nature faker’ fiction by William J. Long and Ernest Thompson Seton, authors who granted their fictive animals decidedly human characteristics.

In the late twentieth century, the scale of this simulation shifted a gear. Scientists played with life on a fundamental level. Genetic engineering produced modified crops and Dolly the Sheep. In selfcontained laboratories, white-coated researchers tampered with the building blocks of the world outside. Divorced from any tangible link with the great outdoors, computer technology created cyborgs,

-175-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
US Environmental History: Inviting Doomsday
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 234

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.