An Economic Development Architecture for New Orleans

By Kevin F. McCarthy | Go to book overview

Summary
In August 2005, Hurricane Katrina, followed by multiple levee failures, devastated New Orleans and other parts of the U.S. Gulf Coast, inflicting major damage to commercial property, infrastructure, and housing. The failure of the levees and the flooding of New Orleans caused enormous damage and disruption to the city, its people, and its economy. Recovering from a disaster of this magnitude poses a major challenge to the city, the state, and the nation. The complexity of this challenge is compounded by the fact that New Orleans’s population and economy had been lagging for several decades before Katrina. Although recovery is under way, it has been proceeding more slowly than the city’s residents, local public and private leaders, and other stakeholders had hoped.In response to this situation, the Horizon Initiative, a private-sector organization, formed to expedite the city’s recovery, asked the RAND Gulf States Policy Institute (RGSPI) to provide recommendations as to the most effective organizational and strategic approaches to revitalizing the city’s economy. Specifically, RGSPI was asked, first, to identify the best practices that other cities have used to foster economic development (in terms of both how they organize their efforts and the approaches they use); second, to describe how these practices might be applied to New Orleans; and third, to recommend actions that might be needed to facilitate the application of those practices in New Orleans. Consistent with the request by the Horizon Initiative, the overall architecture reflected in our recommendations addresses both how the organizational structure should be configured and how it should strategically focus its efforts.The study that produced this report was conducted in three phases. The first was an examination of the development experiences of 17 other cities; the second was a review of studies of New Orleans’s pre- and post-Katrina economic infrastructure and its prior development efforts; and the third involved interviews with a range of individuals from the city’s public and private sectors.
Lessons from Other Cities
Our review of the economic development efforts of other cities revealed several important lessons:
A successful economic development program requires a comprehensive design, an appropriate organization, and an effective implementation plan.
A clear and comprehensive design starts with a vision of what the development authority and community are trying to accomplish, and includes both an appropriate plan or

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
An Economic Development Architecture for New Orleans
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figure and Tables vii
  • Summary ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction 1
  • Chapter Two - Review of Economic Development Efforts 5
  • Chapter Three - Economic Development in New Orleans 15
  • Chapter Four - Summary of Key Findings and Recommendations 33
  • Appendix A - Development Agencies Researched 39
  • Appendix B - Alphabetical List of Interviewees 45
  • Bibliography 47
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 50

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.