How Domestic Trends in the U.S., China, and Iran Could Influence U.S. Navy Strategic Planning

By John Gordon IV; Robert W. Button et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER TEN
Conclusions

This chapter highlights important insights from the preceding chapters. We begin with a summary of important domestic and near-abroad challenges for each of the three primary countries. We then describe common or related trends that are important to all of the nations. Finally, we focus on the likely implications for the U.S. defense establishment in general and the U.S. Navy in particular.


Major Future Domestic and Near-Abroad Challenges

The United States

The United States has today, and will have into the far term, by far the world’s strongest economy. Unlike China, the United States will “get rich before it gets old.” That does not mean that the United States will not experience significant challenges in 2015 and beyond. U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources shows no sign of changing. Tension resulting from the income disparity between the nation’s rich and poor will also be an issue for future U.S. leaders. The most significant challenge for the United States will be its graying population.

Although the United States is and will remain a rich nation, the sheer scale of the needs of its aging population will put considerable strain on U.S. resources. As an increasing number of Americans enter the retired ranks, massive reallocations of government spending toward Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid will take place (unless there is some major change in current U.S. entitlements policy). This reallocation of resources will constrain the nation’s options in other areas,

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How Domestic Trends in the U.S., China, and Iran Could Influence U.S. Navy Strategic Planning
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures ix
  • Tables xi
  • Summary xiii
  • Abbreviations xxvii
  • Chapter One - Introduction and Objectives 1
  • Chapter Two - Strategic Trends in the United States 5
  • Chapter Three - The United States’ near Abroad 29
  • Chapter Four - Strategic Trends in the People’s Republic of China 37
  • Chapter Five - China’s near Abroad 87
  • Chapter Six - Strategic Trends in Iran 97
  • Chapter Seven - Iran’s near Abroad 125
  • Chapter Eight - Japan’s near Abroad 133
  • Chapter Nine - Russia’s near Abroad 143
  • Chapter Ten - Conclusions 159
  • Appendix A - Comparisons 171
  • Appendix B - China’s Coal Future 177
  • Bibliography 191
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