Rand in Southeast Asia: A History of the Vietnam War Era

By Mai Elliott | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
Diversification

The RAND Corporation that emerged at the end of the Vietnam War looked very different from the one that entered it. In 1965, when RAND expanded its presence in Saigon, it was an organization dedicated to serving the needs of the Air Force and to planning for Cold War confrontation with the Communist Bloc. By the time the war ended in 1975, RAND had become less dependent on the Air Force for support and had turned into a diversified organization, as much devoted to domestic issues as to national-security issues.

RAND’s diversification occurred with the advent of Harry Rowen’s presidency. It coincided with new opportunities in the domestic arena as the United States began to disengage from Vietnam and refocus resources on internal problems besetting the country. According to some people at RAND, however, the decision to diversify—and to accelerate diversification—had less to do with the desire to exploit new opportunities and much more to do with the Air Force cut in funding, which deepened in the aftermath of the Pentagon Papers. Gus Shubert, who was instrumental in taking RAND into the new fields, believed that the budget cut was not as instrumental in pushing RAND to diversify as was the perception that RAND was underutilizing its talent, which could be applied to help solve domestic issues confronting the nation.

But he also acknowledged that diversification earned RAND some breathing room and was a good, cautious move, considering the ups and downs in the relationship between RAND and the Air Force. If RAND had continued to rely entirely on the Air Force for funding, this dependence would have given the Air Force much more latitude “to turn the valve all the way shut instead of just three-quarters of the way shut” if it got really upset with RAND.1

As long as he was president, Frank Collbohm had rejected diversification. To Collbohm, RAND was a mission-dedicated organization, and this mission was to protect the United States by supporting the Air Force and to contribute to winning the Cold War. Although Collbohm gave in to internal pressures and external realities and expanded RAND’s clients to include other defense agencies, such as ARPA and DoD,

1 Collins, interview with Gus Shubert, session of July 17, 1992, p. 77.

-615-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rand in Southeast Asia: A History of the Vietnam War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Foreword iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents xiii
  • Photos xv
  • Maps xvii
  • Acknowledgments xix
  • Introduction - Rand- The Beginning 1
  • Chapter One - A Remote Corner of the World- The Beginning in Vietnam 7
  • Chapter Two - "What Makes the Viet Cong Tick?" 45
  • Chapter Three - Escalation and Airpower 91
  • Chapter Four - Controversy 149
  • Chapter Five - The Many Aspects of the War 205
  • Chapter Six - The Mekong Delta and the Central Highlands 249
  • Chapter Seven - The Tet Offensive 285
  • Chapter Eight - Pacification and Vietnamization 349
  • Chapter Nine - The Pentagon Papers 415
  • Chapter Ten - The End of the War 499
  • Chapter Eleven - Laos and Thailand- Sideshows 541
  • Epilogue - Diversification 615
  • Bibliography 627
  • Author Biography 653
  • Index 655
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 672

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.