Connie Mack and the Early Years of Baseball

By Norman L. Macht | Go to book overview
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Connie Mack and the Early Years of Baseball
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vi
  • Illustrations viii
  • Foreword ix
  • Preface xi
  • Acknowlegments xv
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Growing Up in East Brookfield 7
  • 2 - The Young Catcher 18
  • 3 - A Rookie in Meriden 29
  • 4 - The Bones Battery 39
  • 5 - From Hartford to Washington 44
  • 6 - Life in the Big Leagues 52
  • 7 - Mr. and Mrs. Connie Mack 60
  • 8 - Jumping with the Brotherhood 67
  • 9 - The Players’ League 73
  • 10 - Uncertainties of Life and Baseball 84
  • 11 - Connie Mack, Manager 95
  • 12 - The Terrible-Tempered Mr. Mack 108
  • 13 - Fired 120
  • 14 - Milwaukee 131
  • 15 - Working the System 146
  • 16 - Learning How to Handle Men 159
  • 17 - Marching behind Ban Johnson 166
  • 18 - Launching the New American League 184
  • 19 - The City of Brotherly Love and "Uncle Ben" Ben Shibe 194
  • 20 - Columbia Park and the "Athaletics" 204
  • 21 - Raiding the National League 209
  • 22 - The Bullfrogs 220
  • 23 - The Uniqueness of Napoleon Lajoie 227
  • 24 - Winning the Battle of Philadelphia 232
  • 25 - A Staggering Blow 259
  • 26 - Schreck and the Rube and the White Elephant 270
  • 27 - Connie Mack’s First Pennant 282
  • 28 - Signing a Treaty 302
  • 29 - The Profits of Peace 308
  • 30 - The Macks of Philadelphia 325
  • 31 - The First "Official" World Series 336
  • 32 - Rebuilding Begins 359
  • 33 - "We Wuz Robbed" 378
  • 34 - Connie Mack’s Baseball School 406
  • 35 - Shibe Park 421
  • 36 - Connie’s Kids Graduate 434
  • 37 - World Champions 462
  • 38 - Mr. and Mrs. Connie Mack—Part II 492
  • 39 - The $100,000 Infield 498
  • 40 - The Home Run Baker World Series 517
  • 41 - Coasting Down to Third Place 545
  • 42 - Speaking of Money 564
  • 43 - Captain Hook 573
  • 44 - The Second Beating of John McGraw 586
  • 45 - Another Baseball War 603
  • 46 - The Athletics Win Another Pennant—Ho Hum 614
  • 47 - Swept 630
  • 48 - The End of the Beginning 649
  • Epilogue 673
  • A Word about Sources 675
  • Index 677
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