Ballads of the Lords of New Spain: The Codex Romances de los Señores de la Nueva España

By John Bierhorst | Go to book overview

A Note on Orthography

In the following pages Nahuatl terms, wherever introduced in isolation from a particular text, are written in a modernized Franciscan orthography descended from the spelling methods of the Franciscan missionary-linguists of the 1500s. This is the Spanish-flavored orthography widely used by presentday writers on Mexican topics, generally disregarding vowel length and the glottal stop. Thus vowels, roughly speaking, have the continental sounds (ah, eh, ee, oh, oo), except that oh and oo, both represented by the letter “o,” are not distinguished from each other. Consonants are approximately as in English, except that “x” is pronounced sh, “z” has the sound of the “s” in “simple,” and the combinations “cu,” “hu,” and “tl” are similar to English “qu” (in “quick”), “w” (in “water”), and “tl” (in “atlas” whether initial, final, or mid-word, never like the “tl” in “bottle”).

A modernized Jesuit system, derived especially from the seventeenthcentury Jesuit grammarian Horacio Carochi, differs from the Franciscan in marking long vowels with a macron, or overbar, and in consistently using the letter “h” (except in the combination “hu,” see above) to signal the glottal stop. At various points in the present work, terms are respelled in the modernized Jesuit system so that they may be found more easily in modern dictionaries such as Frances Karttunen’s Analytical Dictionary of Nahuatl and my own Nahuatl-English Dictionary (here cited as DICT). For simplicity, macrons are omitted except in a few cases, as needed.

The Romances transcription, however, is strictly paleographic (not respelled or repunctuated), and all quotations from the Romances are likewise paleographic, regardless of inconsistencies and outright errors (which are clarified, as necessary, in footnotes to the English translation). Similarly, quotations from the Florentine Codex (CF or FC), Cantares Mexica-

-xi-

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Ballads of the Lords of New Spain: The Codex Romances de los Señores de la Nueva España
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A Note on Orthography xi
  • Using the Online Edition xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • On the Translation of Aztec Poetry 24
  • Guide to the Vocabulary 71
  • Romances de Los Señores de la Nueva España Ballads of the Lords of New Spain 75
  • Guide to the Transcription 76
  • Part 1 80
  • I 81
  • II 85
  • III 87
  • IV 89
  • V 91
  • V 95
  • VII 97
  • VIII 99
  • IX 100
  • X 101
  • XII 108
  • XIII 109
  • XIV 111
  • Part 2 114
  • XV [Part 2, Song 1] 115
  • XVI [Part 2, Song 2] 117
  • XVI [Part 2, Song 3]30 119
  • XVIII [Part 2, Song 4]36 121
  • XIX [Part 2, Song 5]46 123
  • XX [Part 2, Song 6]59 126
  • XXI [Part 2, Song 7]67 128
  • XXII [Part 2, Song 8] 131
  • XXIII [Part 2, Song 9]82 133
  • XXIV [Part 2, Song 10]92 135
  • XXV [Part 2, Song 11] 137
  • XXVI [Part 2, Song 12] 139
  • XXVII [Part 2, Song 13]108 141
  • XXVIII [Part 2, Song 14]119 143
  • Part 3 146
  • XXIX [Part 3, Song 1]1 147
  • XXIX-a [Part 3, Song 1-a]10 149
  • XXX [Part 3, Song 2] 151
  • XXXI [Part 3, Song 3]21 152
  • XXXII [Part 3, Song 4]33 154
  • Part 4 156
  • XXXIII [Part 4, Song 1]1 157
  • XXXIV [Part 4, Song 2] 159
  • XXXV [Part 4, Song 3] 161
  • Commentary 163
  • Concordance to Proper Nouns 189
  • Verbs, Particles, and Common Nouns 204
  • Appendix I - Two Versions of the Myth of the Origin of Music 207
  • Appendix II - Corrections for the Cantares Edition 211
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 233
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