Ballads of the Lords of New Spain: The Codex Romances de los Señores de la Nueva España

By John Bierhorst | Go to book overview

[XXVII] [Part 2, Song 13]108

10 A shield-roaring blaze-smoke rises up. Ah, and rising up as bell dust it’s equated with your flowers, God.109 In the distance shrills a multitude of eagles, jaguars.

16 He befriends and He shows mercy. In a blaze the dust is stirring: reed F31V flowers turn gold,110 rain down as a blade-mist,111 becoming great.112

4 In War-death Flower Flood Land, at the House of Butterfly Shields,113 Montezuma using javelins recites, tossing off plume-flood-flower picture paintings. He’s gone to that distant Mexico, leaving reed flowers behind.114

12 Flowers are blossoming. Yonder he sings. This Montezuma using javelins recites, tossing off plume-flood-flower picture paintings. He’s gone to that distant Mexico, leaving reed flowers behind.115

108. The song also appears as CM song 69, canto D (61v:9–33). Gloss: ‘of Montezuma II, when [there was] that matter concerning the Huexotzincans’.

109. In place of dios ‘God’ the CM version (at 61v:11) has yaotzin, a name applicable to either Tezcatlipoca or Huitzilopochtli. DICT yaotl. CM 61v:10–11 onnenehuixtoc ‘it is equal’ (the unusual reduplicative -nenehuihuix- may be a copyist’s error).

110. CM 61v:14 Acaxochitl ‘reed flowers’.

111. CM 61v:14 ytzahuatztzetzelihui ‘they drizzle down as a blade mist’.

112. Ohuehueuhtimoma is here treated as onhuehueyatimoman or onhuehueixtimoman ‘they have become great, settling down as a group’. The parallel passage at CM 61v:14 has õcuecuep[on]timan a ‘they have blossomed over an area’.

113. Read chimalpapalocalli imancan ‘where shield-butterfly-house lies’.

114. Literally, ‘there [beyond] in Mexico he has gone in order to leave behind the reed flower(s)’.

115. Here and in the matching stanza, above, in place of ‘he’s gone to that distant Mexico, leaving reed flowers behind’, CM 61v:17 has: oncan in Mexico quipatlan tonacatiçatl ‘in that distant Mexico he’s bartering with sun chalk’, that is, exchanging for equal value (cf. stanza 1: ‘equated with your flowers’).

-141-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ballads of the Lords of New Spain: The Codex Romances de los Señores de la Nueva España
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • A Note on Orthography xi
  • Using the Online Edition xiii
  • Introduction 1
  • On the Translation of Aztec Poetry 24
  • Guide to the Vocabulary 71
  • Romances de Los Señores de la Nueva España Ballads of the Lords of New Spain 75
  • Guide to the Transcription 76
  • Part 1 80
  • I 81
  • II 85
  • III 87
  • IV 89
  • V 91
  • V 95
  • VII 97
  • VIII 99
  • IX 100
  • X 101
  • XII 108
  • XIII 109
  • XIV 111
  • Part 2 114
  • XV [Part 2, Song 1] 115
  • XVI [Part 2, Song 2] 117
  • XVI [Part 2, Song 3]30 119
  • XVIII [Part 2, Song 4]36 121
  • XIX [Part 2, Song 5]46 123
  • XX [Part 2, Song 6]59 126
  • XXI [Part 2, Song 7]67 128
  • XXII [Part 2, Song 8] 131
  • XXIII [Part 2, Song 9]82 133
  • XXIV [Part 2, Song 10]92 135
  • XXV [Part 2, Song 11] 137
  • XXVI [Part 2, Song 12] 139
  • XXVII [Part 2, Song 13]108 141
  • XXVIII [Part 2, Song 14]119 143
  • Part 3 146
  • XXIX [Part 3, Song 1]1 147
  • XXIX-a [Part 3, Song 1-a]10 149
  • XXX [Part 3, Song 2] 151
  • XXXI [Part 3, Song 3]21 152
  • XXXII [Part 3, Song 4]33 154
  • Part 4 156
  • XXXIII [Part 4, Song 1]1 157
  • XXXIV [Part 4, Song 2] 159
  • XXXV [Part 4, Song 3] 161
  • Commentary 163
  • Concordance to Proper Nouns 189
  • Verbs, Particles, and Common Nouns 204
  • Appendix I - Two Versions of the Myth of the Origin of Music 207
  • Appendix II - Corrections for the Cantares Edition 211
  • Bibliography 221
  • Index 233
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 237

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.