Exorcism and Money: The Symbolic World of the Five-Fury Spirits in Late Imperial China

By Qitao Guo | Go to book overview

3
The Rise of Local Pantheons
in the Mid Ming

Zhu Yuanzhang tried to create a lasting subsistence economy, but he could not anticipate the effect of a century of political restabilization and economic reconstruction that began with his reign. During this century, commodity production slowly developed, and this development promoted the unequal distribution of land. As a consequence, the village-subsistence ideal of the early Ming was gradually eclipsed by a commercial-landlordist model of rural life, which at the same time also fed the growth of an urban economy.1 All of this paved the way for dramatic socioeconomic changes that accelerated after the mid Ming, especially over the course of the sixteenth century. The economy became monetized and society increasingly urbanized, particularly in the Jiangnan region.2

The new socioeconomic environment of the mid Ming ushered in new beliefs and new ritual customs and formats, which generated new religious symbols and old ones restructured into new devine systems. In particular, Zhu Yuanzhang’s arrangement of the city and earth gods inevitably underwent local transformation in the new climate. The first half of this chapter analyzes the metamorphosis of Chenghuang and Tudi exorcism in local society. In the second half I will begin to shift my focus to southern Anhui, exploring how this mid-Ming change led to the construction of the local pantheon or Wuchang’s new symbolic world in Guangde

subprefecture.

1. Brook, Confusions of Pleasure; idem, Praying for Power, p. 314.

2. See, e.g., Han Dacheng, Mingdai chengshi yanjiu, esp. appendix 1—a long list of hundreds of cities and towns that emerged during the second half of the Ming dynasty (pp. 666–689).

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Exorcism and Money: The Symbolic World of the Five-Fury Spirits in Late Imperial China
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.