A Word from Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio

By Cynthia B. Meyers | Go to book overview

7 Two Agencies

Batten Barton Durstine & Osborn,
Crafters of the Corporate Image, and
Benton & Bowles, Radio Renegades

Successful advertising agencies differed from one another in more than just their advertising strategies. While the divide between the hard and soft sell is especially well illustrated by the contrasting practices of Blackett-Sample-Hummert and Young & Rubicam, many other agencies routinely relied on both strategies, emphasizing hard sell or soft sell more or less for particular clients or campaigns, or as advertising trends shifted. Batten Barton Durstine & Osborn, the agency whose name was compared to the sound of a trunk falling down the stairs on Jack Benny, was the foremost specialist in institutional advertising for large corporate clients seeking to improve their public image. Throughout the 1930s and 1940s, BBDO worked to convince consumers of the benevolence of U.S. Steel, General Motors, General Electric, and Du Pont.1 Its reputation rested in part on the prominence of its famous copywriter Bruce Barton, who was best known for his bestseller about Jesus, The Man Nobody Knows, and who also served briefly as a Republican congressman. Benton & Bowles, on the other hand, was a maverick agency, forced by the exigencies it faced at its founding on the cusp of the Depression to break the rules and innovate agency practices. Led by two Yale-educated Democrats, William Benton and Chester Bowles, B&B was not a typical agency, and its leaders were not typical admen in certain respects, but their contributions to radio practices had farreaching effects. By first challenging basic agency practices, and then the problem of the radio model of broadcasting itself, both Benton and Bowles helped undermine conventional wisdom and then, when each had gone on to careers in politics, education, and business, became vocal critics of commercial broadcasting, using their insider knowledge

-170-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Word from Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 392

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.