Christianity and Classical Culture: A Study of Thought and Action from Augustus to Augustine

By Charles Norris Cochrane | Go to book overview

INDEX
Academics (New Academy), 41, 164, 431.
Actium, 15.
adaptability of Roman genius, 95, 102.
Aeneid, 28, 64, 65 ff.
Alexander the Great, 8, 15; rise, 86; character, 87; aims, 88; cosmopolitanism, 89; effect of conquests, 89 f., 278.
Alexandria, 190, 258, 271, 280, 332, 340.
alimentaria, 140, 199, 220.
Ambrose of Milan, career, 347-50; belief in church's authority, 349 f.; typical Western churchman, 373; ethical teaching, 374 f.; cited or mentioned, 187, 190, 201, 325, 332, 380.
Ammianus Marcellinus: philosophy of, 311 f.; as historian, 314 ff.; limitations, 316 f.; 256, 271, 284, 288, 290, 344.
Anthony, St., Life of, 339 ff., 361.
Antonines, state of empire under, 137; ff.,144,; 'slogans' coined by, 140 f.
Antoninus Pius, 137, 139, 141.
Antony, Marc, 11 f., 13.
Apollo, 66, 68, 70, 84, 161, 274.
apotheosis: of Caesars, 25, 110; for Christians, 371 f.
Ardashir of Persia, 153.
Arian controversy, Arianism, 209 f., 233 f., 257 f., 332, 335, 340, 363.
aristocracy: republican, under Caesars, 123 ff.; imperial, 144; local, oppression of, 202, 252; frivolity of, 314 f.; 331, 353.
Aristotle: his idea of justice, 76; theory of human nature, 80 ff.; concept of the polis, 82 f.; defence of slavery, 84; cited, 31, 49, 74, 75, 86, 87, 103, 105, 111, 122, 141, 144, 234, 243, 368, 400, 451, 469, 478, 499, 501, 502.
Arius, 210, 218, 232 ff.; Constantine and, 249.
army: and emperor, 109, 116 f.; curiales in, 252 f.; Christians discouraged from, 285; recruiting in 4th cent., 297 ff., 319 f.
Arnobius Afer, 191.
astrology, 2 f., 102, 132, 158, 478; forbidden, 255, 295.
Athanasius: contra mundum, 257 f.; methods, 258 f.; Julian and 271, 284; Trinitarianism of, 361 f.; and
Arians, 364 ff.; 187, 190, 339, 447.
Athens, 82 f., 472 f., 493; in Peloponnesian war, 85 f.
auctoritas, 17; of Emperor, 116 ff.
Augustan History, 173.
Augustine: tribute to Cicero, 39, to Plato, 376; Vergilian antitype of Civitas Dei, 71, 397; De Moribus Ecclesiae, 342; De Civitate Dei, 397 ff.
modern estimates, 377 ff.; career, 381 f., 390; attitude to Classicism, 383 f., 400, 419, 430; Confessions, 386 ff.
on stage-plays, 391; education, 392 ff.; religious development, 395 ff.; faith and reason in, 400 ff.; philosophy of, ch. xi passim; Trinitarianism of, 410 o ff.; Christology, 416 f.; epistemology, 432 ff.; view of sapientia, 435 f.; on space and time, 438 f.; human will, 446 ff.; interpretation of Scripture, 474 ff.; philosophy of history, 480 f., 486, 496; disbelief in historical cycles, 483; theory of two societies, 488 f.; classification of gods, 497; on grace, 504.
realizes limits of state action, 510; cited or mentioned, 71, 73, 150, 163, 165, 214, 218, 241, 242, 248, 344, 503.
Augustus: aims, 1, 3; success, 16 f.; constitutional position, 19 f., 108 f.; policy, 22 ff.; apotheosis, 25, 110; Vergil and, 28; and Cicero, 38, 61; permanence of his work, 74; methods, 93 f.; Livy and, 108; peace policy, 115 f.; use of censorial power, 121; problems confronting, 122 ff.; currency reform, 143; 71, 102, 201, 278.
Aurelian, 3, 150, 179.
Ausonius, 313. 'autarky', seeself-sufficiency.
Barbarians, northern, 116, 138; invasions, 153, 297, 319, 351; conversion of, 210, 217; intermarriage with, 311, 346; Theodosius and, 344 f.; Church and, 357. See also Constantine, frontiers, Goths.
Basil, St., and monasticism, 341, 399.
bourgeoisie, Constantine and, 182, 202, 205.
brigandage in 4th cent., 354.
Caesarism, 115; its failure, 157.
Caesaropapism, 187, 207, 268.
Caesars, literary tradition on, 126, 129.
calendar reformed by Theodosius, 330 f.
Capitol as seat of university, 310.
Carthage, 33 f., 67, 91.
Catholicism, accepted as principle of citizenship, 328 f., 332, 334.

-517-

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Christianity and Classical Culture: A Study of Thought and Action from Augustus to Augustine
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Part I- Reconstruction 1
  • II- Romanitas: Empire and Commonwealth 27
  • III- Roma Aeterna: the Apotheosis of Power 74
  • IV- Regnum Caesaris Regnum Diaboli 114
  • Part II 177
  • VI- Quid Athenae Hierosolymis? the Impasse Of Constantinianism 213
  • VIII- State and Church in the New Republic 292
  • Part III- Regeneration 359
  • XII- Divine Necessity and Human History 456
  • Index 517
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