Between Pulpit and Pew: The Supernatural World in Mormon History and Folklore

By W. Paul Reeve; Michael Scott Van Wagenen | Go to book overview

Contributors

Matthew Bowman is a PhD candidate in the department of history at Georgetown University. His dissertation examines the role of religious practice in the fundamentalist–modernist controversy in early twentieth-century evangelicalism, particularly in New York City. In addition to Mormonism and evangelicalism, he is interested in lived religion, liturgy, urban history, and pro basketball. His work has received awards from the University of Utah, the Charlotte W. Newcombe Fellowship Foundation, the Gilder-Lehrman Institute for American History, and the Mormon History Association. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Kevin Cantera received a master’s degree in history from the University of Utah. He works as a freelance writer and teaches history at Salt Lake Community College. With his wife and three children, he currently lives in Payson, Utah, within eyeshot of the Dream Mine site, and just north of the Old Nephite Highway.

Alan L. Morrell is an information specialist at the Church History Library of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City and a PhD candidate in history at the University of Utah. His dissertation looks at the role of boundaries in the construction and maintenance of Mormon identity at the local level. He lives in Bountiful, Utah, with his wife and four children.

W. Paul Reeve is an associate professor of history at the University of Utah. The University of Illinois Press published his first book, Making Space on the Western Frontier: Mormons, Miners, and Southern Paiutes, in 2007. The Mormon History Association awarded Making Space the Smith-Pettit Best First Book award in 2008. He is the coeditor with Ardis E. Parshall of Mormonism: A Historical Encyclopedia,

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