Peculiar Portrayals: Mormons on the Page, Stage, and Screen

By Mark T. Decker; Michael Austin | Go to book overview

7
Jane Austen in Mollywood
Mainstreaming Mormonism in Andrew Black’s Pride & Prejudice

JULIETTE WELLS

In interviews in June 2003, during filming of their feature-length version of Jane Austen’s novel Pride and Prejudice, director Andrew Black and producer/coscreenwriter Jason Faller made clear their hope of reaching viewers both inside and outside the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, of which they are members.1 “We’re [trying] to make a film that appeal[s] to both insiders and outsiders,” the Scottishborn Black explained to a reporter at Brigham Young University (BYU), from which both he and Faller had recently graduated. “It’s almost like ‘My Big Fat Greek Wedding’ where the culture is just a backdrop.”2 Central to this effort was their choice to update Austen’s novel, which Black and Faller considered to have broad appeal, especially to women viewers. Pride and Prejudice “has a huge following,” Faller told the Deseret News, a Salt Lake City daily newspaper. “It’s kind of like ‘Star Wars’ for women.”3

Unlike the 2005 period version of Pride & Prejudice directed by Joe Wright, Black and Faller’s Pride & Prejudice, which is set in presentday Provo, can hardly be said to have reached a huge audience. It was screened in a very limited geographical area—Utah, Arizona, and Idaho—before being released on DVD,4 and outside that region, it was reviewed only in Variety (in an article that noted that “careful grassroots marketing will be required” for the film to succeed financially).5 Created on a $350,000 budget, Pride & Prejudice grossed $373,942 at the box office.6 In its DVD incarnation, however, the film has indeed benefited from its connection to Austen. Enthusiasts can find Pride & Prejudice listed among other adaptations of her novel on the Web site of the Jane Austen Society of North America (JASNA) and the Austen fans’ site, the

-163-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Peculiar Portrayals: Mormons on the Page, Stage, and Screen
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 203

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.