Serium Senectutis

By Elias of Thriplow; Roger Hillas | Go to book overview

BOOK FIVE

Anyone bright enough to know how to think, whose sober mind Lets him live sanely, should constantly temper his tongue: An importunate tongue, glib mouth, and unrestrained lips Scarcely create a man of character. A wordy man is slow to direct his affairs aright; Often he foolishly forestalls his own undertakings; He often harms himself with his tongue, and his slippery tongue Makes him odious to himself and to his companions. For the excessively loquacious, the tongue is often A harmful cause of senseless evil, even death: Zambri learned this, plowing a stupid spouse, And stupidly atoning for his joyful follies in his sport, When upright Phinees, because of his zeal for the law, Followed the fool and killed the wanton goat; By his probity Phinees perpetuated a special name For himself and earned himself unending glory. Together proud Dathan and Abyron sensed the same, When they stupidly desired to burn incense to God. Moses’ sister Miriam sensed the same, impudent in the murmur She started against her brother Moses: Livid leprosy betrayed this disfigured woman, and the pallor Which proved the erring one guilty revealed her sacrilege. Inspired by these examples, a forceful man should struggle hard To banish the vice of garrulity far from him.

[1.] After my fellow’s importunity had incited me to utter such a recklessly diffuse and protracted discourse, he spoke as follows, as if my audacity had caused him to mend his ways and become somewhat more moderate than usual: Undoubtedly, brother, I should, with ears readily attentive in expectant silence, strive to

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Serium Senectutis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Parentibus Optimis vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Conspectus Siglorum 47
  • Helie Rubei Tripolawensis Serium Senectutis1 48
  • Book Two 57
  • Book Three 75
  • Book Four 119
  • Book Five 147
  • Book Six 151
  • Book Seven 155
  • Book Eight 163
  • Book Nine 173
  • Book Ten 181
  • Book Eleven 197
  • Book Twelve 211
  • Book Thirteen 217
  • Commentary 227
  • Appendices 247
  • Bibliography 257
  • Indices *
  • Index Verborum 273
  • Index Auctorum 293
  • Index Nominum et Rerum 295
  • Mrts 303
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