Serium Senectutis

By Elias of Thriplow; Roger Hillas | Go to book overview

BOOK TEN

Any man will rightly be valued but slightly If he is feared on account of his irrational words; A speaker utters his speech sensibly If his speaking tongue desires to join with it The power of reason, and his mind avoids lies; If he refuses to live together in concord with his fellows, One among many, and behaves himself senselessly, His life in commons will become odious to his fellows. Humble manners normally cement close ties; Marginal behavior sunders social bonds. But if you have proofs, you should adduce them At your pleasure to serve as apt support For the statements you made earlier with a serious face, So you suitably support your assertions.

[1.] It seems to me, Brother, I replied, that your contradictory statements have made you far more brazenly superfluous than usual. Lacking the purity of logic or truth, you are no less tardily circumspect when you do not blush to deny the immortality of man’s soul, unique among animals, even though you grant that the prerogative of rationality is granted to man alone among the animals. Nor can I imagine that you would dare to deny it, were it not that you absurdly affect delirious or insane notions; instead, reason alone, a precious thing without price, causes man to become like, or in some measure equal, the highest spirits or angels.

[2.] Brother, in order that I might, to the best of my ability, attend to your words and intent, graciously and without any fear of abhorrent squabbling, I will try to put forward at least some of the arguments which I have learned for the immortality of the human soul. If you are willing, we will begin by adducing a trivial and meretriciously commonplace example of the durability of man’s soul, even an apparent proof of its immortality. In fact, the matter has long been known to men through a frequent and familiar experience. To speak of a true commonplace, when anyone who has

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Serium Senectutis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Parentibus Optimis vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Introduction 1
  • Conspectus Siglorum 47
  • Helie Rubei Tripolawensis Serium Senectutis1 48
  • Book Two 57
  • Book Three 75
  • Book Four 119
  • Book Five 147
  • Book Six 151
  • Book Seven 155
  • Book Eight 163
  • Book Nine 173
  • Book Ten 181
  • Book Eleven 197
  • Book Twelve 211
  • Book Thirteen 217
  • Commentary 227
  • Appendices 247
  • Bibliography 257
  • Indices *
  • Index Verborum 273
  • Index Auctorum 293
  • Index Nominum et Rerum 295
  • Mrts 303
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 308

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.